Risk Management Guide: Responding to the Coronavirus

Employers and their employees have plenty of questions about COVID-19 and its impact on the workplace. Here are the answers to their most urgent inquiries.

Employee Benefits Provisions in the CARES Act

Congress has passed the Coronavirus, Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (The CARES Act), a $2 trillion stimulus package containing many provisions designed to bolster the economy during the COVID-19 crisis. Click here or on the image to learn how the CARES Act also includes several provisions that affect employee benefit plans summarized in this alert.

COVID-19 Resources

Articles, case studies, white papers and more to help you protect your business, your employees and your personal assets.

Update #3 – COVID-19 Claims and Coverages

To our CCIG clients, In early March, CCIG pulled together our top…

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Update #2 – CARES Act Guides to Help You Navigate Ahead

The programs and initiatives in the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security,…

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Update #1 – Uninterrupted Service: A Special Note to Our Clients

To our valued clients: As we continue to closely monitor COVID-19 news,…

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Employee Benefits

Articles, case studies, white papers and more to help you protect your business, your employees and your personal assets.

COVID-19 Alert: Rules and Regulations on Furloughs, Layoffs

Among the many issues employers are facing in the wake of the…

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COVID-19 Alert: Benefits Amid Sick Leave, Furloughs and Layoffs

Many employers are faced with a significant number of employee leaves of…

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Employee Work from Home Guide

In an age when more and more positions require duties to be…

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CARES Act Includes Employee Benefits Provisions

Congress has passed the Coronavirus, Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (The…

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FAQs on COVID-19 Testing, Health Insurance and Cobra Regulations

We’ve received many questions from both employers and employees about COVID-19 and…

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Employee Benefits and the Families First Coronavirus Response Act

The Families First Coronavirus Response Act signed by President Trump requires most…

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Risk Management

Articles, case studies, white papers and more to help you protect your business, your employees and your personal assets.

Construction Group Develops COVID-19 Safety Template

It’s a smart list. Clean and disinfect frequently used tools and equipment…

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Protecting Your Work-From-Home Employees

If you’re like many Americans at the moment, you’re settling into a…

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Keeping Your Business Going During COVID-19  

The disruption to the economy is like nothing any of us have…

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Coronavirus and Workers’ Comp Claims

Does workers’ compensation insurance cover your workers should they contract COVID-19? That…

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How Nursing Homes Can Protect their Residents from the Coronavirus

Workers not washing their hands before moving to the next patient. Workers…

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Coronavirus Business Losses Could be Tough to Recover

We’ve seen plants closed, flights canceled and cruise-ship passengers quarantined. So will…

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Health Insurance Providers Respond

Health insurance providers are working to help prevent the spread of the coronavirus. They have activated emergency plans to ensure that Americans have access to the prevention, testing, and treatment needed to handle the current situation. Click here to learn more about ways health insurance providers are taking action.

Does workers’ compensation insurance cover your workers should they contract the coronavirus? That question comes up a lot. Here's the answer.How to Protect Yourself

Older adults and people who have severe underlying chronic medical conditions like heart or lung disease or diabetes seem to be at higher risk for developing more serious complications from COVID-19. But they’re not alone in their susceptibility.

Creating an Infectious Disease Outbreak Response Plan

You may have an outbreak plan ready to go. But if not, the point is to make sure you protect your workforce from the coronavirus, officially known as COVID-19, while ensuring continuity of operations. In case of an outbreak, all sick employees should stay home and away from the workplace, respiratory etiquette and hand hygiene should be encouraged, and routine cleaning of commonly touched surfaces should be performed regularly.

Items to consider in developing a response plan:

  • Identify possible work-related exposure and health risks to your employees. OSHA has more information on how to protect workers from potential exposures to COVID-19.
  • Review HR policies to make sure that policies and practices are consistent with public health recommendations and are consistent with existing state and federal workplace laws (for more information on employer responsibilities, visit the Department of Labor’s and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s websites).
  • Explore whether you can establish policies and practices, such as flexible worksites (e.g., telecommuting) and flexible work hours (e.g., staggered shifts), to increase the physical distance among employees and between employees and others if state and local health authorities recommend the use of social distancing strategies. For employees who are able to telework, supervisors should encourage employees to telework instead of coming into the workplace until symptoms are completely resolved. Ensure that you have the information technology and infrastructure needed to support multiple employees who may be able to work from home.
  • Identify essential business functions, essential jobs or roles, and critical elements within your supply chains (e.g., raw materials, suppliers, subcontractor services/products, and logistics) required to maintain business operations. Plan for how your business will operate if there is increasing absenteeism or these supply chains are interrupted.
  • Set up authorities, triggers, and procedures for activating and terminating the company’s infectious disease outbreak response plan, altering business operations (e.g., possibly changing or closing operations in affected areas), and transferring business knowledge to key employees. Work closely with your local health officials to identify these triggers.
  • Plan to minimize exposure between employees and also between employees and the public, if public health officials call for social distancing.
  • Establish a process to communicate information to employees and business partners on your infectious disease outbreak response plans and latest COVID-19 information. Anticipate employee fear, anxiety, rumors, and misinformation, and plan communications accordingly.
  • In some communities, early childhood programs and K-12 schools may be dismissed, particularly if COVID-19 worsens. Determine how you will operate if absenteeism spikes from increases in sick employees, those who stay home to care for sick family members, and those who must stay home to watch their children if dismissed from school. Businesses and other employers should prepare to institute flexible workplace and leave policies for these employees.
  • If there is evidence of a COVID-19 outbreak in the U.S., consider canceling non-essential business travel to additional countries per travel guidance on the CDC website.
    • Travel restrictions may be enacted by other countries which may limit the ability of employees to return home if they become sick while on travel status.
    • Consider cancelling large work-related meetings or events.

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